What’s the Word?

Let’s Build our Vocab Courtesy of Merriam Webster’s Word of the Day.       

I like these words and they will definitely rack up points in Scrabble or Literati!       

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coeval:  \koh-EE-vul\:  adjective

Meaning

of the same or equal age, antiquity, or duration

Example Sentence:  “How old is this ancient town? One guess: It dates to 2600-2500 B.C. — more or less coeval with nearby Stonehenge … which may date to 3100 B.C.” (The Philadelphia Inquirer, February 12, 2007)

zaftig:  \ZAHF-tig\:  adjective

Meaning

having a full rounded figure : pleasingly plump
 
Example Sentence:  The Flemish painters were masters of the oil medium, rendering zaftig beauties, robust burghers, hunting scenes, and allegorical subjects with subtle interplays of light and color.
 
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logomachy:  \loh-GAH-muh-kee\:  noun  

Meaning  

1 : a dispute over or about words  

*2 : a controversy marked by verbiage   

Example Sentence:  The surprising election results have opened the floodgates of logomachy in the political media outlets.
 
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thew:  \THOO\ :  noun  
 
Meaning  
 
1 strength, vitality; 1 ba : muscular power or development; *2 : muscle, sinew — usually used in plural
 
Example Sentence:  “Care I for the limb, the thews, the stature, bulk, and big / assemblance of a man! Give me the spirit,” retorts Falstaff to Justice Shallow in Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 2
  
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martinet:  \mar-tuh-NET\:  noun  

Meaning     

1 : a strict disciplinarian;
*2 : a person who stresses a rigid adherence to the details of forms and methods
       

Example Sentence:  Spencer complained that his office manager was a power-hungry martinet who compelled him to follow ridiculous rules.       

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triskaidekaphobia:  \triss-kye-dek-uh-FOH-bee-uh\:  noun       

Meaning     

fear of the number 13       

Example Sentence:  “Billy Hart suffers absolutely no triskaidekaphobia. The Salem Avalanche infielder has worn No. 13 for six years….” (Katrina Waugh, The Roanoke Times [Virginia], July 14, 2007)       

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gloze:  \GLOHZ\:  verb       

Meaning     

*1 : to mask the true nature of : give a deceptively attractive appearance to — often used with “over”       

2 : to deal with (a subject or problem) too lightly or not at all — often used with “over”       

Example Sentence:  “His modesty and shyness were at any rate proverbial, and it does seem that he went out of his way to conceal or gloze over certain aspects of his career, his military exploits in particular.” (Eleanor Perenyi, Green Thoughts)       

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felicitous: \fih-LISS-uh-tus\: adjective       

Meaning     

*1 : very well suited or expressed : apt; 2 : pleasant, delightful       

Example Sentence:  The film’s score, at least, is felicitous, as it lends emotional intensity to the otherwise wooden acting.       

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myrmidon: \’MER-muh-dahn\:  noun       

Meaning     

a loyal follower; especially : a subordinate who executes orders unquestioningly or unscrupulously       

Example Sentence:  The boss was more likely to offer promotions to her myrmidons than to those workers who occasionally questioned her tactics or proposed alternate solutions.       

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chapfallen: \CHAP-faw-lun/: adjective       

Meaning       

1 : having the lower jaw hanging loosely       

*2 : cast down in spirit : depressed       

Example Sentence:  The team’s failure to make it to the playoffs yet again was another disappointment, but hardly a surprise, for its chapfallen and long-suffering fans.       

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ukase: \yoo-KAYSS\: noun       

Meaning       

1 : a proclamation by a Russian emperor or government having the force of law
2   a : a proclamation having the force of law   *b : order, command
       

Example Sentence:  “The professor’s first instruction to the [playwriting] class was a ukase: Never begin a play with a telephone ringing.”       

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invective: \in-VEK-tiv\: noun       

Meaning       

1 : an abusive expression or speech       

2 : insulting or abusive language : vituperation       

Example Sentence:  The sonnet is an invective against the poet’s wife and the man who cuckolded him.       

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In honor of Halloween, I guess.       

lycanthropy: \lye-KAN-thruh-pee\: noun       

Meaning       

1 : a delusion that one has become a wolf
2 : the assumption of the form and characteristics of a wolf held to be possible by witchcraft or magic
       

Example Sentence:  The 1941 film The Wolf Man starred Lon Chaney, Jr., as a man cursed with lycanthropy.       

 

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